[ Login ]

Advertising

Last completed movie pages

Monster Island; Nevermind; Puoi baciare lo sposo; La mataviejitas; Apuesta mortal; Por Tu Ingrato Amor; Nada a Perder 2; House Arrest; Instalatér z Tuchlovic; Jamaibabu; Hannibal Brooks; The Rainbow Tribe; Knallerfrauen; Immaculate Conception; Madness in the Method; (more...)

1948 Austin A125 Sheerline [DS1]

1948 Austin A125 Sheerline [DS1] in The Saint, TV Series, 1962-1969 IMDB Ep. 6.03

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: UK

1948 Austin A125 Sheerline [DS1]

[*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

nzcarnerd NZ

2007-06-19 10:01

Quote

Triumph Renown?

Bebert FR

2007-06-19 12:37

Quote

Not a Triumph Renown... :/
La porte avant s'ouvre dans l'autre sens et la partie ouvrante du coffre n'est pas bombée. De plus, il ne semble pas y avoir de vitre de custode.

-- Last edit: 2007-06-19 12:38:51

Sunbar UK

2007-06-19 12:53

Quote

All I can think is that its similar to a Rolls Royce Silver Dawn?

sixcyl FR

2007-06-19 14:13

Quote

It doesn't match with a RR Siver Dawn (shape of the rear side window, rear bumpers).. it seems not to be a Triumph Renown (Limousine) neither (round shape of the boot, miss of the C-pillar window) , though rims are maching quite well with Triumph , Could it be a 1800 Sedan (different from 'Renown' with 4 lateral windows)?...but I've no pics of this last one , and don't how it looked like exactly :/

-- Last edit: 2007-06-19 14:15:49

Bebert FR

2007-06-19 15:36

Quote

C'est la même voiture.
Elle fut d'abord commercialisée sous le nom de "Town and Country", puis "1800" et enfin "Renown".

Sunbar UK

2007-06-19 15:43

Quote

...agreed. For all that I can find the extra window in the 'C' pillar was used in the 1800 and Renown being the same body.

Sunbar UK

2007-06-19 15:46

Quote

Do we definitely agree that the front doors are front-hinged?

I cannot be sure but I think so, unless the explosion? has blown it completely off. Any comments?

This would be an important difference for some car models.

DynaMike NL

2007-06-19 17:57

Quote

I'd think of an Austin A 110 or A 125 Sheerline...

banger134 EN

2007-06-19 18:17

Quote

I'm also thinking A125 sheerline

Sunbar UK

2007-06-19 18:21

Quote

DynaMike wrote I'd think of an Austin A 110 or A 125 Sheerline...


banger134 wrote I'm also thinking A125 sheerline


Agreed...... I never considered the Austins but the doors are right, the hub-caps and the rear design including the boot and C pillar.

dudley UK

2007-06-19 18:42

Quote

Doors look right: http://www.motorbase.com/profiles/vehicle/picture.ehtml?i=274;p=-899233351

Sunbar UK

2007-06-19 19:17

Quote

Austin A125 Sheerline is agreed then.

Alexander DE

2007-06-19 20:46

Quote

Yes, agreed.

Developed as 'Austin 25' it was launched in February 1947 as the 'Austin A110 Sheerline' with a 3.5 litre, 110 bhp engine and upgraded to the 'Austin A125 Sheerline' in November 1947 with a 4 litre, 125 bhp engine. That way it was produced until August 1954. Being the short-wheelbase version the model code is [DS1].

johnfromstaffs EN

2009-02-10 17:16

Quote

This was on TV yesterday, in UK.

The villain of the piece disappears round a corner driving his Bentley S1. Templar, in his wheezy Volvo P1800S couldn't keep up, so the Bentley is off shot when a loud explosion is heard. Scene cuts to the Sheerline in flames. At the time the Bentley would have been worth three or four thousand pounds, the Sheerline could have been bought for about £100. Cheap production values or what!!

-- Last edit: 2009-02-10 17:17:44

Pierre EN

2017-02-14 04:58

Quote

Very successful ITC series made at Elstree, and exported very profitably.
Were the A125's Lucas headlamps removed before the car was ignited?
Waste of a nice car, whose build quality was on a par with Bentleys of that era. Not sure about the 'wheezy' P1800, that model being something of an automotive record holder for longevity, with one example having recorded 2,800,000 miles or so. Nor about Mk VI values in 1967. Legend and contemporary copies of 'Motor Sport' reveal Cricklewood Bentleys, at least, could be bought for something like £295.
£3-4,000 was a huge sum in the late 1960s. Our much-loved loved Banstead semi sold for £8,350 (Nov '70). Today, you can almost add two noughts to its price.

johnfromstaffs EN

2017-02-14 08:49

Quote

My comment was about the value of a Bentley S1 in 1967, very different from a MkVI. The Volvo was about as sporting as a 100E Prefect, the longevity of one example hardly qualifies it for much, and was a rust bucket of epic proportions. The citing of values of "WO" Bentleys in the 60s means little, they were just old cars in a specialist market. Similar values applied to vintage Royces and Aston Martins to name but two. Nothing alters the fact that the value of an S series Bentley would have far exceeded that of an old Sheerline funeral follower at the time.

The Simmons of Mayfair ad on page 381 of the May 1962 edition of Motor Sport has a 1954 R-type Hooper for sale at £1825, and a 1927 3 litre for £425. Magazine pulled at random from my pile.

-- Last edit: 2017-02-14 09:38:14

Add a comment

You must login to post comments...

Advertising