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1953 Vauxhall Wyvern [EIX]

1953 Vauxhall Wyvern [EIX] in London Airport - Heathrow in the 1950s & 60s, Documentary, 2006

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: UK

1953 Vauxhall Wyvern [EIX]

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

johnfromstaffs EN

2020-10-11 12:42

Morris Oxford MO

Vauxhall Wyvern E

Morris Eight Series E
Ford. Zephyr 6?

-- Last edit: 2020-10-11 14:55:50

zodiac SE

2020-10-12 13:19

Yes, a Ford Zephyr Six, MY 1951-53 [EOTTA].

For the record:
The Mk1 Zephyr had to be called "Zephyr Six" (with letters) if Ford UK (ENFO = ENglish FOrd) was to be allowed to use the Zephyr name. According to Ford USA, the Lincoln Zephyr V-12 was still in peoples memory, and if UK only used a digit 6, the model name would be too similar. The Consul was a new model name and thus didn't have to have any more letters.
When the Mk2 models were introduced, Ford Uk was allowed to use the "Zephyr" without any additional info, as the Mk1 models had been that successful, the Lincoln Zephyr was, more or less, forgotten.

When the Mk3 models were introduced, Ford UK had inflated their model range, with several versions called Consul (Consul 335, Consul 375, Consul Corsair amongst others), and the Zephyr had more than one engine. Then it was called Zephyr 4 and Zephyr 6 to separate them.

-- Last edit: 2020-10-12 13:20:54

sixcyl FR

2021-08-21 10:27

Vauxhall Wyvern match better.

johnfromstaffs EN

2021-08-21 10:43

sixcyl wrote Vauxhall Wyvern match better.


?

Gamer DE

2021-08-21 10:49

Isn't the more likely postwar, less likely prewar sedan the most interesting?

johnfromstaffs EN

2021-08-21 11:00

They are all automotive grey porridge, the Series E was a set of 1920s type mechanics dressed up in a 1930s body, the Oxford could barely get out of its own way, we had one about which my dad was always moaning. The Vauxhall Wyvern was a depressing rust bucket with a prewar 35bhp engine pulling nearly a ton. At least the Zephyr Six had a decent engine (68bhp) and handled fairly well due to MacPherson strut front suspension and a rigid body structure.

Later Wyverns at least got a new design short stroke engine producing 45bhp, but it still suffered from rust and a three speed gearbox.

-- Last edit: 2021-08-21 11:13:04

Gongora ES

2021-08-21 11:09

Wow ... a depressing view of the British auto industry. :lol: Despite this they were massively exported and were very popular cars ... Personally I love the rear design of the Vauxhall

-- Last edit: 2021-08-21 11:09:46

johnfromstaffs EN

2021-08-21 11:19

This is because the industry at the time could sell any old junk it could make, due to catching up into a car starved world following WW2. Vauxhalls were basically Chevrolets with weedy British engines and no rust proofing, Morris were stuck with flathead engines due to Lord Nuffield not liking pushrods, Austins were blessed with sloppy steering and suspension and the Standard Vanguard was too big for a family on a budget.

My immediate family generally bought Morris cars, my Dad having learned to drive on a Morris Eight Series 1 in the 1930s. Following the creation of BMC, Austin designed 1.5 litre engines were used in the Oxford, which improved it greatly.

In my opinion, for family motoring at that time, Ford had the best range of cars, although still using flathead engines in some small models until 1962. The Rootes cars, again IMO, did not have much to sell until the Audax Minx and its derivatives.

-- Last edit: 2021-08-21 11:37:04

Gongora ES

2021-08-21 12:47

I understand ... Well, my uncle's father bought a second-hand black 4-door Austin a30 or a35 around 1959 and when they went to town in Burgos (northern Spain), the children were shocked to see it ... Standard 8 was imported in small quantities for the ministerial mobile park in Spain

johnfromstaffs EN

2021-08-21 13:06

The A30 was underpowered, and its crankshaft bearings were not up to high mileages, The A35 was much better, as was the Minor 1000. Standard had a one model policy, the 2 litre Vanguard, until the introduction of the 8 and 10 in 1954/55. Not only was it ugly, at 2 litres its engine was too big for Mr. Average. The Standard 8 was very basic, no boot lid, balanced drop windows and thin seats, the 10 was a deluxe version. In general, rather than buy a new small car in the early 50s, a larger prewar car in good condition if you could find one, was a better decision.

I learned to drive in a Ford Cortina Mk1, and took my driving test in my Dadís 1959 Vanguard Estate, shortly after that he bought an Austin Cambridge, and then a Triumph 2000.

-- Last edit: 2021-08-21 13:11:32

Gongora ES

2021-08-21 13:52

An improved version of the 8 was imported to Spain.
https://www.escuderia.com/standard-8-series-1-curious-survivor/
I understand that situation in the United Kingdom ... but in Spain even the Standard 8 was seen as a real luxury, since it was not until August 1953 that series cars began to be manufactured (the first was the Renault 4/4, on the contrary than most people think the Seat 1400 was) and years of waiting lists aside, the price was only for wealthy families. The only serial car that had at the beginning of the 50s was the ill-fated Eucort, which the Franco government annihilated by putting up many obstacles so that it did not compete against the Seat.
[Image: eucortsedana.jpg]

Gongora ES

2021-08-21 15:26

johnfromstaffs wrote The A30 was underpowered, and its crankshaft bearings were not up to high mileages, The A35 was much better, as was the Minor 1000. Standard had a one model policy, the 2 litre Vanguard, until the introduction of the 8 and 10 in 1954/55. Not only was it ugly, at 2 litres its engine was too big for Mr. Average. The Standard 8 was very basic, no boot lid, balanced drop windows and thin seats, the 10 was a deluxe version. In general, rather than buy a new small car in the early 50s, a larger prewar car in good condition if you could find one, was a better decision.

I learned to drive in a Ford Cortina Mk1, and took my driving test in my Dadís 1959 Vanguard Estate, shortly after that he bought an Austin Cambridge, and then a Triumph 2000.

The Vanguard Estate is a pretty and rare (for me) car. Was It a good car?

johnfromstaffs EN

2021-08-21 17:33

It was a Phase 3 Vanguard Vignale with 4 on the floor. At that time we had just bought a new house so Dadís cars went through a period of being a bit well used, this was quite rugged, but a bit agricultural, it was reliable though. I preferred the Triumph 2000 that came about 18 months later, which was very smooth and had overdrive on 3rd and 4th.

/vehicle_1150890-Standard-Vanguard-Estate-1959.html

-- Last edit: 2021-08-21 17:37:55

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