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1939 Commer Superpoise Q4 3-ton GS

1939 Commer Superpoise Q4 in Worker and War-Front, Documentary, 1942-1946 IMDB Ep. 02

Class: Trucks, Simple truck — Model origin: UK

1939 Commer Superpoise Q4 3-ton GS

Position 00:06:49 [*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Sunbar UK

2015-09-29 12:34

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[Image: 1_026-36ww-f.jpg] [Image: 1_026-27ww-f.jpg] [Image: 1_026-52ww-f.jpg] [Image: 1_026-56ww-f.jpg] [Image: 1_026-58ww-f.jpg]

Commer wartime trucks being assembled at the Biscot Road Luton factory. Some trucks appear to have their army registration number temporarily written on the cab door which could mean these were assigned before the build started. Trucks are also shown being driven off from the streets, with terraced houses, adjacent to the factory.

Sunbar UK

2015-10-02 14:04

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Looking at the main picture, on the cab roof passenger side, edit: is the spare wheel without the tyre. It was later placed in the spare wheel rack (still tyre-less) as it was driven off by the ATS women. So possibly tyres were in short supply and fitted later by the army.

1939 Commer Superpoise army truck wartime publicity photograph

-- Last edit: 2015-10-05 11:44:51

johnfromstaffs EN

2015-10-02 16:33

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It is odd that this model is very rare compared with the Bedfords. I do not recall ever seeing one in films or documentaries, perhaps there was a decision to standardise on Bedfords for the 3-ton GS, and use the Rootes six cylinder truck engine in the Humber variants.

Sunbar UK

2015-10-02 17:46

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For the little I have read, yes for Rootes vehicles Humber was ordered by the military in preference to Commer or Karriers.

Commer & Karrier wartime vehicles consisted of some 27.000 produced to June 1944, Bedford production was almost 250,000. The size of the Vauxhall factory in wartime production of trucks and tanks was also considerably larger.


Both Bedford and Commer in the 1940s were made in Luton within 2 miles of each other so whilst bombing raids were not frequent, Commers suffered I think more damage than Vauxhall considering their relative sizes.

Sunbar UK

2017-08-19 11:33

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Almost 9 Bedford OY trucks for every Commer Q4 truck produced during WWII, and Bedfords accounted for a third of all British trucks combined.

Still a considerable number of Commers were made. I think it maybe that our perception is distorted by the fact that war films were made after the 1950s. These relied on Bedfords that may have been refurbished for civilian use between 1945 and the early 1950s, or remained in military service until the Bedford RL became the preferred truck for the Army.

"More than 9200 (Commer Q4 Suppoises) produced under 10 wartime contracts. The (Bedford) OY-series was the most numerous British 3-tonner with 72,385 examples produced between 1940 and 1945." http://www.armyvehicles.dk/commerq4.htm and http://www.armyvehicles.dk/bdoy.htm

dsl SX

2017-08-19 12:53

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What's the one on left with the more angular body edges??

Sunbar UK

2017-08-19 15:45

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1941 Karrier K6 3-Ton GS 4x4 as here /vehicle_848708-Karrier-K6-1941.html

Seen it remarked that "Commer probably knocked up the cab design overnight or on overtime".

I think I've seen views of the cab before assembly in the same movie. I need to confirm.

johnfromstaffs EN

2017-08-19 17:27

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I wonder if some twerp at the ministry thought that the Karrier order would be a second source to assure supplies if Commer had problems!

JCB UK

2017-08-20 09:33

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Karrier did the 4x4s Commer did the 4x2's in WW2.
Maybe because Karrier did the more specialised stuff in peacetime like road sweepers.
Some Karrier products ( armoured cars ) were named Humber to stop confusion with 'Bren Carriers'.

The Karrier K6 3-ton 4x4 were usually ( always?) fitted with winches (as in this photo at rear of chassis) so they were issued in small numbers to army transport companies for use as recovery as well as general load carrying.

Generally in WW2 just a case of banging out as many trucks as possible and the Commer Q4 and Bedord OY 3 ton 4x2s were little different from their civilian parents and simple to make.

The postwar Q4 was a different beast with 4x4.

-- Last edit: 2017-08-20 10:22:38

Sunbar UK

2017-08-20 11:54

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I like to try at least to understand how different chassis codes originated but usually with little success.

However from Imperial War Museum Archive documents the 'Q4' designation was dropped post-war. It appears that it was officially named purely as "Commer 3 ton, GS, 4x4" whereas the wartime model was called "Commer Q4 3-ton 4x2 Cargo in the official literature"

The post-war Commer Q4 4x4 naming may have resulted by it being in common usage rather than being official.

JCB UK

2017-08-20 17:39

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Q4 designation on the postwar 4x4 is so widespread I am surprised it is not official.

The later 4x4s were beasts to drive apparently but survived a long time in army service because a lot were fitted with specialised 'house type' bodies for things like Radar Repair.

AFS versions also long lived of course because little use and / or kept in storage.

-- Last edit: 2017-08-26 08:52:26

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