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1917 Metropolitan Carriage and Wagon Mark IV Tank 113 'Julian'

1917 Metropolitan Carriage and Wagon Mark IV in The Big Melt: How Steel Made Us Hard, Documentary, 2013 IMDB

Class: Others, Military armored vehicle — Model origin: UK

1917 Metropolitan Carriage and Wagon Mark IV Tank 113 'Julian'

Position 00:51:13 [*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

dsl SX

2014-03-20 00:46

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[Image: 51-19tank.jpg] [Image: 51-19tanka113.jpg]

[Image: 51-19tankc113.jpg] [Image: 51-19tankd113.jpg]

[Image: 51-19tanke113.jpg] [Image: 51-19tankf113.jpg]

[Image: 51-19tankg113.jpg]

All footage has 113 numbering. Have recently seen a WW1 anniversary programme (for some reason we're going bananas in UK marking the outbreak of war with loads of programmes and events) which said that public appeals were launched for folk to donate money for the army to buy tanks, and that their reward was public demonstrations of the tank they'd "bought". However this looks an army audience.

mike962

2014-03-20 00:54

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no 113 was called "Julian" was a Mark IV used for demonstrations

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tank_Banks

mike962

2014-03-20 00:55

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producer "Metropolitan "


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The Mark IV was built by six manufacturers: Metropolitan (the majority builder), Fosters of Lincoln, Armstrong-Whitworth, Coventry Ordnance Works, William Beardmore and Company and Mirrlees, Watson & Co., with the main production being in 1917. The first order was placed for 1,000 tanks with Metropolitan in August 1916. It was then cancelled, reinstated and then modified between August and December 1916. The other manufacturers, contracted for no more than 100 tanks each, were largely immune to the conflict between Stern and the War Office.[5]


-- Last edit: 2014-03-20 00:55:26

dsl SX

2014-03-20 01:01

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How do we name it?

mike962

2014-03-20 01:11

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well you found it, you could add 113 Julian as extra info , back in ww1 it was tradition to name them just like ships

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