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unknown

unknown in London - The Modern Babylon, Documentary, 2012 IMDB

Class: Cars, Coupé

unknown

Position 00 34 09 [*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

dsl SX

2014-01-20 00:56

Quote

Looks like a fabric roof coupé.

zodiac SE

2014-01-20 10:42

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Not strange at all, as they (the sheet metal makers) couldn't make such a large metal pressing until around WW2. That is according to a friend of mine who has restored a 34 Plymouth.
What the car manufacturers usually did, was to press the sides and span the roof with fabric.

-- Last edit: 2014-01-20 10:44:57

dsl SX

2014-01-20 18:33

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A long time ago (too long to attempt to trace the actual reference now) I read an article by LJK Setright (eccentric car historian, but always fascinating) who proposed the invention of the interior heater as one of the most significant advances in car design. His arguments were two-pronged - firstly that it meant people no longer had to wear outdoor clothes (hats, thick coats etc) in cars so passenger compartments could become smaller (width, height). his second was that it provided an incentive for designers to make interiors weatherproof (windows, doors, sealing, body material, etc). Maybe as ^ above large sheet metal pressing technology for car roofs did not emerge until 1930s/WW2, but equally there was probably little demand/advantage in having full metal construction until proper weatherproofing became possible.

I don't know how true Setright's argument pans out in practice but I like its analysis, and the idea that technology often relies on unrecognised minor advances to get to the stage where big steps become possible.

johnfromStaffs EN

2014-01-23 23:46

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Judging from the matte finish of the body compared with the wings, I would suggest that this car is constructed on the Weymann system, using a wooden frame clothed with two layers of leathercloth stuffed with kapok. The principal advantages of this system were lightness and the fact that the body could flex with the chassis in the days when good roadholding required stiff springs and a flexible chassis. The principle disadvantage was that the bodies were not very durable, especially when cheaply built. This car looks like it could be an Alvis, an Invicta or a large MG or something of that type, there are wire wheels with knock off spinners, and I would be fairly certain that it is a fixed head coupe and those hood irons are dummies.

Unless there is a more informative picture we shall not find out. As this is a picture taken during WW2, it seems that the car has lasted well and been carefully maintained as it would be at least ten years old when the picture was taken.

dsl SX

2014-01-24 00:29

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That was the best view possible. Just slightly more of rear here
[Image: 34-09coupeb.jpg]
but not expecting miracles. It may be one of those to wait until the source film turns up.

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