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1950 Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane

1950 Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane in Lettera aperta a un giornale della sera, Movie, 1970 IMDB

Class: Cars, Convertible — Model origin: UK — Made for: I

1950 Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane

[*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Alessandro58 CH

2012-10-03 09:42

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[Image: vlcsnap-2012-10-02-17h08m26s199.jpg]

chris40 UK

2012-10-03 10:05

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Armstrong Siddeley Hurricane, 1946+.

dsl SX

2012-10-03 12:46

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Nice find - our first one - and somewhere unexpected. Any clue whether it was LHD or RHD? 2606 made 1946-53 with many exported (including apparently several to Uruguay). Excellent Oxford 1:43 model released in 2011 - Link to "www.carmodel.net" .

tore-40 NO

2012-10-03 13:27

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Lowered hood line, one-piece radiator and fixed engine bay walls as of late 1949, so MY1950-1953. Could be 15HP or 18HP (In-line four- or six-cyl, 2 or 2.3 liters)

dsl SX

2012-10-03 13:59

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I looked very closely to see if this had the late 49+ revisions (which also included a black stoneguard at front of rear wheel arches) and could not decide. Online photos of supposedly early and late examples did not give any difference I could recognise, and the black paint here means stoneguard does not stand out.

Also our 2 Typhoons are both pre-49 and front body looks identical to this one - see /vehicles.php?make=Armstrong+Siddeley&model=Typhoon&modelMatch=1&modelInclModel=on .

Alessandro58 CH

2012-10-03 16:43

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dsl wrote Any clue whether it was LHD or RHD?


There is no better view in the movie.

Alessandro58 CH

2012-10-03 16:45

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In the scene from the main pic, the gentleman says: "Cheap to buy but expensive to refurbish".

tore-40 NO

2012-10-03 19:19

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-There is no gap visible under the top five ribs (i.e. a one-piece radiator grille)

-The front of the hood follows the line along the side of the car; the early ones were straight Old one: Link to "www.google.no"

-The stoneguard is hard to spot on a black car, sure

-Watch the position of the emblem beeing higher on early models

-Also, there is a significant difference in the height of the front plate of the hood itself

dsl SX

2012-10-03 19:32

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Excellent explanation - thanks.

johnfromStaffs EN

2012-10-03 20:22

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tore-40 wrote Lowered hood line, one-piece radiator and fixed engine bay walls as of late 1949, so MY1950-1953. Could be 15HP or 18HP (In-line four- or six-cyl, 2 or 2.3 liters)


There was never a four cylinder variant. Both engines in-line six cylinder overhead valve.
16hp 1991cc
18hp 2309cc

The only four cylinder Armstrong Siddeley post war was the Sapphire 234.

-- Last edit: 2012-10-03 20:23:21

tore-40 NO

2012-10-03 21:31

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You're absolutely right, John, six, not four. :whistle: Do you agree with the rest of the logic?

johnfromStaffs EN

2012-10-04 09:57

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Yes. It's a later model, using the same style front end pressings as a Whitley, ie the bonnet is a flatter "lid". As I have mentioned before, we had in the family a Whitley saloon (GBO 838 Cardiff 1952 Black) followed by a Sapphire 346 four light saloon (NYO 817 London 1953 Light Green over Dark Green), and then the Bentley R-type which I still have.

The 1946 16hp Lancaster, Typhoon and Hurricane were among the first postwar designs to be offered by any British company, the 16 engine being carried on from the prewar 16hp saloon. It was a bit underpowered for the car, and re-engineered to the 18hp for introduction in 1949 giving the cars a bit more performance. The Typhoon was dropped from the range in 1950 presumably to make room for the Whitley which only ever had the 18hp engine. Transmission options were a four speed Rootes-built synchromesh with normal clutch, and the four speed Wilson pre-selector gearbox with centrifugal clutch, not unlike a Daimler of the period. The razor edged styling of the Whitley made it my favourite of these models.

Link to "www.google.co.uk"

-- Last edit: 2012-10-04 17:32:41

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