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1970 Hillman Avenger DeLuxe

1970 Hillman Avenger in The Way it Was, Documentary, 2001

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: UK

1970 Hillman Avenger DeLuxe

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

dsl SX

2011-08-11 13:14

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Nice - 1970+ deluxe. Any clue to where/when filmed?

cko US

2011-08-12 15:30

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In 2010, it looks like there were 5 Avengers remaining on UK roads if I read the chart correctly.In The US, Hillman sold one of their cars under the "Plymouth Cricket" name and only about 7 or 8 are known to survive on these shores.These are notorious for their short lifespan.

dsl SX

2011-08-12 16:04

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A lot more than 5 (hoorah!). http://howmanyleft.co.uk/combined/hillman_avenger has 220 licensed (ie running on the road) and 186 SORN (not licensed, so stored off road). Plus there will be Chrysler Avengers and Talbot Avengers. So no need to panic yet. Cricket was only sold in US for 71-74 and not a great sales success, but disappointing if only 7-8 are left.

cko US

2011-08-12 23:52

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The sources Ive heard indicated fewer than a dozen Crickets in N.America,and Ive never seen one in person.
Sorry, I thought SORN meant the car had been decommissioned...Either exported out of the country or sent to the scrap yard.

chicomarx BE

2011-08-12 23:57

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dsl wrote SORN (not licensed, so stored off road)

What happens if you just keep it in a shed without the SORN?

Sandie SX

2011-08-13 00:01

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Nothing though the government are cracking down on it. You either have to SORN it or you have to tax it now.

chicomarx BE

2011-08-13 00:06

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Ok. I don't see how that's a concern for the government if it's off public roads.

Sandie SX

2011-08-13 00:08

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Link to "www.which.co.uk"

dsl SX

2011-08-13 02:07

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The whole SORN issue is a typical example of Government finding ways to create extra bureaucracy to trap people while claiming to solve a problem. What they should do is to think laterally and provide basic 3rd party cover as part of the annual road tax, therefore every licensed car becomes fully compliant with insurance law. Result - huge saving on costs for everyone, no uninsured drivers as long as the car is taxed. Gov't could block-buy or guarantee this insurance at a hugely reduced rate compared to what everyone individually pays and save money from removing this function from police/DVLA. Anyone who wants enhanced insurance can still buy whatever they want as add-ons from existing insurers. Annual UK cost of current uninsured drivers is reported as £500m, plus all the enforcement, registration process and database costs. About 28 million cars licensed for road use in UK. The equation may not balance yet, but it can't be too far adrift once all the wasted time etc is costed in across the economy. When I'm elected emperor, it's on my to-do list ..

cko US

2011-08-13 03:17

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For now, in the US its still pretty relaxed.Our leadership is using the more tax-heavy European countries as the blueprint on how to do things and they keep trying to force alternative-energy cars on people who dont want them.Soon enough I fear they will tax old or inefficient cars right off the road and into the scrapyard.Check out the youtube videos of the luxury and sports cars scrapped in the "Cash For Clunkers" program.Right now,its mostly ordinance enforcement that people have to worry about:Unlicensed cars parked in plain view or cars parked in 1 spot too long,and they get ticketed and towed.If someone decides not to renew their registration and parks a car in a garage or barn for 10 years,nothing happens. One day, a decade later, someone may want to buy the car.As long as they have a copy of the title,they'll be fine.No back taxes. No fines for lapsed registration if the car is not being driven. I hope that doesnt change soon.
On an unrelated note, does anyone know what countries have the highest per-capita amount of old (over 15 years) cars still on the road? My guess is the US,particularly in western states like Washington, Oregon and Colorado.Someone told me Mexico has a lot but I havent heard anything to substantiate that.

dsl SX

2011-08-13 03:47

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Cuba could be a contender??

ingo DE

2011-08-14 21:37

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In Germany cars without a valid insurance and not tax-paid are to identify (if everything is according to the instructions) are to identify by the destroyed silvermetallic (in the past white) sticker on the plates. If you put the car out of registration, you have to bring the plates to the authority, where the seal-stickers were destroyed. Then you aren't allowed to use -driving and parking- it on public poads and places. But for private ground this rule doesn't go. You can keep there as long as you want (only when oil and fuel is leaking, you can get in trouble, even when it's on private ground).
When it shall be back in traffic, you need a valid TÜV-inspection and an insurance-confirmation to get a new registration. For a while you can reserve the former plate-combination. The Fahrzeugbrief (a document similar to the "title" in the USA or the V5C in the UK) stays valid for 7 years without registration.

-- Last edit: 2011-08-14 21:38:32

ingo DE

2011-08-14 21:39

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dsl wrote Cuba could be a contender??

For
dsl wrote When I'm elected emperor, it's on my to-do list ..
:think:

dsl SX

2011-08-14 22:00

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ingo wrote For ....

cko's question - does anyone know what countries have the highest per-capita amount of old (over 15 years) cars still on the road?

ingo DE

2011-08-14 22:21

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There were more candidates for that in the past, caused by restrictive import-laws or, in other cases, due the lack of valuable currency. Unfortunately (for us car-lovers) a lot of the first mentioned countries (as New Zealand and Israel for example) have opened the borders for new or used imports, so within a short time all the nice classics were thrown away :(
In the DDR -both points fitted to it- the renewal of the whole fleet happened very fast - in a few months between after early 1990 (DDR-citizens were allowed to import used cars), along the 1.July 1990 (the D-Mark has replaced the worthless DDR-Mark -nickname "Alu-Chips") the 3.Oktober 1990 (unification with the introducing of all West German laws and rules, incl. the TÜV-inspection) up to late 1992 (all former DDR-cars had to pass the TÜV and get a real -Western- registration) hundreds of thousands, even millions of -99% COMECON made- vehicles went ot the junkyards and shredders. I remember, how it looked back then. Even in Western Germany we had large mountains of hundreds of shortly before deeply loved Trabants, Wartburgs, Lada, Moskviches, Sapohorhetses, Dacias and Skodas.

Gomselmash11

2011-08-14 23:24

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dsl wrote
cko's question - does anyone know what countries have the highest per-capita amount of old (over 15 years) cars still on the road?

Argentina, Uruguay (for sure) and Cuba.

cko US

2011-08-16 04:17

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I know in Europe people are starting to collect older American cars and apparently can import them in.Ive seen reports that there is an uprising of collectors in Russia trying to bring in old American luxury cars.In the Philippines, the import restrictions have gotten tougher and its pretty much impossible now to bring ANY used car into the country.People from other countries are taking advantage of relaxed laws for used cars and taking the old muscle cars out of the country but no one can bring in even a high-value classic.In other words, we can take their old Camaros but we wont be allowed to bring it back.Seems to be that the European countries are probably the least strict when it comes to importing used vehicles.

Gomselmash11

2011-08-16 19:00

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@ CKO: NO. Bolivia, Peru, Paraguay, northern Chile receive lots of 2nd hand and 3rd hand cars. And they have no real restrictions in the practice.

ingo DE

2011-08-16 22:49

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cko wrote Seems to be that the European countries are probably the least strict when it comes to importing used vehicles.

For stuff, coming from outside the EU there are some import-tax-regulations, but they go for all kind of stuff not only cars. But they aren't too high, so bearable. For vehicles there are no specific import-restrictions any more. IIRC Spain had up to 1986 the strictest rules for that, but due the EU-wide equalization all these country-spec laws were deleted.

The main problem with imported cars is, that they have to pass the many requirements about safety, emissions, lighting, etc. With classic cars you don't have much problems, as always the year of the first registration is determining. So if you import a 1970-car, it has to have the specifications, which were required here in 1970. With newer cars you will have much more trouble. So for example it's absolutely impossible to get a ZA-made Citi Golf officially in registration. Or a Tata Nano.

And for commercial vehicles like trucks there are special regulations about weight, size, measures, etc. - the reasons, why never heavier Japanese trucks like Nissan Diesel or Hino were sold here. Their specifications are so different, that it was never interesting for the makers, to create EU-law-according versions.

cko US

2011-08-17 17:16

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The only place in Latin America I could find auto classifieds for so far was Costa Rica and that place is a bit different due to all the N.American tourism and investment.Most pre-1990 vehicles were 4x4s (Jeep, Toyota,Izusu Trooper),German cars (VW and Mercedes) or Toyotas and Datsuns/Nissans. I also found a site awhile ago from Puerto Rico but many people seem to consider them more USA than anything.Quite a few '70s Toyotas and Colts.

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