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2003 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor [P71]

2003 Ford Crown Victoria [P71] in Paul, Movie, 2011 IMDB

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: US — Built in: CA

2003 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor [P71]

[*][*][*] Vehicle used by a character or in a car chase

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

ford_guy US

2011-05-16 15:38

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Edited: Just to add here the view of the old main picture

[Image: Paul00041.jpg]


2001-2002 Police Interceptor [P71] model.

I'm almost sure this is the same one, so they can be re-grouped:
/vehicle_399257-Ford-Crown-Victoria.html

-- Last edit: 2011-07-12 19:21:27 (vilero)

jettalover US

2011-05-17 04:18

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I saw the movie there was two similar blacks CVs in this movie.

vilero ES

2011-07-12 19:26

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Changed old picture. In the movie there are 3 Crown Vics. The one driven and crashed by Paul the alien /vehicle_399257-Ford-Crown-Victoria.html and the ones driven by FBI. This is the one driven by Agent Zoil (Jason Bateman)

[Image: Paul00046.jpg] [Image: Paul00021.jpg] [Image: Paul00023.jpg]

And this the one driven by the two silly agents

[Image: Paul00025.jpg] [Image: Paul00050.jpg] [Image: Paul00051.jpg]

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-12 19:30

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I will revise my previous ID based on your new captures. The main car (driven as you say by Zoli) is a 2003-2004 model.
The one driven by the "silly agents" is a 2001-2002 model.

G-MANN UK

2011-07-12 19:52

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If it's an FBI car, shouldn't it have U.S. Government plates? Although that wouldn't be any good for going incognito.

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-12 19:58

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Yes it should. I suppose they had a small budget or just didn't care. They would need a whole different car to go incognito :p

G-MANN UK

2011-07-12 20:48

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That's the thing, why is it in every TV drama or film with undercover police officers (or maybe just plain clothes officers) they still drive a Crown Vic? :D

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-12 21:03

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Most people overlook the fact that there is a difference between "undercover" police vehicles and "unmarked" police vehicles. Undercover vehicles and officers are supposed to blend in. They are not supposed to even give any hint that they belong to law enforcement. Unmarked vehicles on the other hand aren't necessarily designed to blend in, just to not stand out very much. Such is the case with detectives and investigators (I mention these due to their prevalence in movies and TV shows). They represent their agencies and line of work and therefore drive vehicles such as CV's but they are unmarked as they don't want to stand out. Detectives aren't necessarily in the business of getting flagged down on the street to solve a petty crime on a regular basis (for example), and therefore they don't drive marked cars. I haven't seen this movie but by the looks of it the FBI agents aren't looking to be incognito.

However, this rule isn't always followed in productions :whistle:

G-MANN UK

2011-07-12 21:22

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But with unmarked cars, isn't a Crown Vic still a big giveaway? Why don't they use something else completely that's not so ubiquitous as a police car? Or are unmarked cop cars not always Crown Vics and I'm being too influenced by films and TV?

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-12 21:33

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Most times it doesn't matter though as officers who usually drive unmarked cars aren't trying to hide their identify or profession. If anything clearly unmarked police cars (where you can see the GOV plates, emergency lights, antennas, etc.) have their advantages as well as they add a sort of presence to the streets. When people see an unmarked Crown Vic police car, they slow down on the road or generally think twice. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. As for using something else. Other vehicles are used although they are along the lines of Ford Tauruses, Chevrolet Malibus, etc (not exactly extremely incognito). The Crown Victoria is good as well as it is spacious and gives officers the performance they need. Don't forget that these are also used in events such as car chases. Many departments specifically state that their officers aren't allowed to engage in high-speed pursuits unless they are in a pursuit-certified vehicle. And also, it sometimes turns out to be cheaper in the end as they can get both marked and unmarked cars together through a mass order and it is easier to maintain a fleet of cars that are similar. That's a general overview, but there are many additional technical reasons.

rtsbusman1997 US

2011-07-12 21:36

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Nah, the Crown Vic is not that big of a giveaway. Thousands are sold to the public, and so it is a hit or miss that the car is undercover. Also,unmarked and undercover cop cars are not always Crown Vics. You'd be surprised at the cars used for undercover work. Look at Pittsburgh in the 1990s.

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-12 22:04

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I was talking about active duty cars. Also, most people tend to think twice with any Crown Vic period, unless it's clearly a taxi. And again you're confusing the term "undercover" with unmarked. I don't think most people would be surprised with what's used as undercover cars. It all depends on the context of the undercover operation, for example. Pittsburgh is a bit of an isolated incident. They used non-package police cars as marked cars, not just unmarked.

G-MANN UK

2011-07-13 00:40

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rtsbusman1997 wrote Thousands are sold to the public, and so it is a hit or miss that the car is undercover.


I thought since a couple of years ago Crown Victorias were only as "fleet cars" (taxis, police/law enforcement etc.) and not available to the public to buy new. I suppose you can still buy them second hand though.

It's just in movies it looks funny when detectives are watching/following someone and of course they're in a Crown Victoria or Chevy Caprice. :D I suppose it's become sort of visual shorthand. Because of this I think in some British movies/cop shows they often put detectives in Vauxhalls or Fords (believe it not Fords are considered somewhat British, they were once made here), but in fact British police cars are more diverse than that (each force chooses their own cars and they don't stick to British), it's not "Oh there's a black Vauxhall Vectra/Ford Mondeo, it could be an unmarked police car, better slow down." :D

-- Last edit: 2011-07-13 00:58:29

APS221 US

2011-07-13 02:23

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I agree with Ford Guy. Many people get "undercover" and "unmarked" confused. Take "Miami Vice" for example. When Sonny Crockett goes undercover as Sonny Burnett, he drives a cool exotic car. He doesn't drive around in an unmarked Diplomat or Gran Fury like Lt. Castillo.

I find the difference between a marked patrol car and an unmarked detective car is like the difference between an officer in uniform and a detective in plain-clothes. Like a uniformed officer, a marked patrol car is meant to stand out and be readily identifiable to the public. To aid in visibility they have roof-mounted emergency lights and reflective graphics. A detective is not trying to stand out in a crowd, but he's also not trying to fool anybody in to thinking he's not a cop. Once you're close with a detective or an unmarked police car, it's easy to identify them. A detective carries a gun and badge, but they're usually concealed under a jacket. With an unmarked police car, it's usually easy to tell once you're up close. The car is often the same make and model as the standard patrol car, but the lights are concealed inside the passenger compartment or behind the grille. It's not trying to say "I'm not a cop." Instead it says, "I'm official."

I find these issues being discussed in relation to the new (in the United States) Holden-based Caprice. Chevrolet offers both a patrol version [9C1] and a detective version [9C3]. The detective version isn't meant to be an "undercover" car, it's not being sold to civilians. Like the Crown Victoria, which was "fleet only" in the final years of production, they're not meant for "undercover" use. They're meant for detectives and administrators who need to drive a police car, but don't need the roof-mounted lights and reflective graphics.

rtsbusman1997, Crown Victorias are a bigger "giveaway" now than they were in the 1990s. Back then, when Crown Victorias were sold to the public, they were seen as an "old man" car. Even Matlock drove one (/vehicle_27624-Ford-Crown-Victoria-1992.html). In the past few years, Crown Victorias have only been sold to taxi and government fleets. As a result, they have become associated with those professions.

I know a retired FBI agent. He worked for the FBI from 1967 to 1998. He said the undercover agents liked to drive Pontiacs. When I was in college, I did an internship with the County Police. I saw some undercover detectives once, and they were driving a Pontiac Grand Am. I often saw plain-clothes detectives and they would usually drive unmarked Crown Victorias. Sometimes, they would also use Tauruses (Taurii?) from the County's central vehicle pool.

-- Last edit: 2011-07-13 02:31:17

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-13 04:09

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Well put APS221. I couldn't have said it better myself. And G-MANN, you also have a point and it's something that I find a bit comedic as well at times :lol:

rtsbusman1997 US

2011-07-13 05:11

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APS221 wrote rtsbusman1997, Crown Victorias are a bigger "giveaway" now than they were in the 1990s. Back then, when Crown Victorias were sold to the public, they were seen as an "old man" car. Even Matlock drove one (/vehicle_27624-Ford-Crown-Victoria-1992.html). In the past few years, Crown Victorias have only been sold to taxi and government fleets. As a result, they have become associated with those professions.

I know a retired FBI agent. He worked for the FBI from 1967 to 1998. He said the undercover agents liked to drive Pontiacs. When I was in college, I did an internship with the County Police. I saw some undercover detectives once, and they were driving a Pontiac Grand Am. I often saw plain-clothes detectives and they would usually drive unmarked Crown Victorias. Sometimes, they would also use Tauruses (Taurii?) from the County's central vehicle pool.


I see your point there. My bad.

rtsbusman1997 US

2011-07-13 05:30

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Ford_Guy wrote I was talking about active duty cars. Also, most people tend to think twice with any Crown Vic period, unless it's clearly a taxi. And again you're confusing the term "undercover" with unmarked. I don't think most people would be surprised with what's used as undercover cars. It all depends on the context of the undercover operation, for example. Pittsburgh is a bit of an isolated incident. They used non-package police cars as marked cars, not just unmarked.


I meant that a example like Pittsburgh does show what cars are used as undercover and unmarked cars in many cities across the US. They are very hard to spot mainly because they are used mainly as civilian cars and many people doubt that large cities would use. In fact, I should have been clearer with what I meant. I meant that since so many are sold in public auctions by the city, county, or government that used said car, not to mention the numerous businesses that acquires them aftermarket, mainly taxi companies, that some people would automatically assume that the CV is either a: 1.Taxi or 2. Second hand civilian operated car.

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-13 05:43

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Forgive me if I'm misunderstanding what you're saying but it goes more like this. When people see a CV, they assume:

1. It's a cop.
2. It's a cop.
3. It might be a cop.
4. Taxi
5. Civilian operated car.

:lol: I put it this way simply to make fun of a weird side effect I think the Crown Victoria legacy has produced. About 99% of people associate them with cops. Since most people aren't familiar with the subtle differences between the 1998-2011 CV generation, they always assume it could be a cop, and then a taxi or privately-operated vehicle.

rtsbusman1997 US

2011-07-13 05:54

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Hmm. You do strike a good point there. :p

Ford_Guy US

2011-07-13 05:56

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I think that ultimately we can all agree that the CV is no longer an incognito car by any stretch of the imagination :lol:

ingo DE

2011-07-15 10:16

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G-MANN wrote "Oh there's a black Vauxhall Vectra/Ford Mondeo, it could be an unmarked police car, better slow down." :D

In the 80ies this was indeed thought over here, when the people have seen a VW Passat or Santana in basic trim line, with any ugly extra-charge-free colour, especially in combination with a reflecting license plate (which had cost extra until 1989).
When my Dad's 1981 Passat in "monacoblau" ws still a bit shiny, it was really funny to see, that many drivers were slowing down, when it ws parked one the side :lol:

In the 90ies, the /vehicles.php?resultsStyle=asImages&yearFrom=1990&yearTo=1996&makeMatch=2&make=ford&modelMatch=1&model=escort&modelInclModel=on&modelInclChassis=on&class8=8&origin=DE&madein=&madefor=&role= was very common for the purpose as civil radar-control-car. I've done that, too, slowing down, when I've seen a parked Escort Turnier.

Nowadays smart drivers have look on parked VW Caddys ;)

m.pfaffeneder DE

2011-07-15 13:01

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@ingo: In my "homevillage" are radar-control-cars every week. Every day (I think) about 2500-3000 vehicles are driving through the village. So it┤s quite worthwhile for them. On both ends of the village are small lay-by┤s, where they are parking. You often see Opel Astra G,F Caravan, Citroen Berlingo┤s, Renault Kangoo┤s and also VW T4┤s. Or Caddy┤s :D

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