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1930 AEC Renown LT

1930 AEC Renown LT in BBC The Voice of Britain, Documentary, 1935 IMDB

Class: Bus, Double-deck — Model origin: UK

1930 AEC Renown LT

Position 00:02:41 [*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

dsl SX

2016-03-12 01:37

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[Image: 02-41busesa.jpg] [Image: 02-41busesb.jpg]

Any of them - whichever you want

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-03-12 16:24

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AEC NS Type facing the camera, and AEC LT Type going away.

dsl SX

2016-03-12 17:20

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LT wins it for rarity in our collection

dsl SX

2016-03-12 17:30

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Is there any difference between LT and Renown LT??

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-03-12 18:21

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The same as between RT and Regent RT.

Link to "commons.m.wikimedia.org"

Regal
Regent
Renown
Reliance

were AEC chassis names, the remainder of the nomenclature being either LGOC/London Transport class names, or in the case of provincial operators, coachbuilder's names and maybe body titles. To make things more complex, the chassis went through various mark numbers as well, hence "AEC Regent III RT Park Royal" or whatever.

Like the chassis, the coachwork went through evolutions, with the addition of roofs, inside staircases, different widths and lengths as legislation changed. Like all bespoke vehicles, there is no simple yes or no to any questions of this type.

-- Last edit: 2016-03-12 20:03:08

stevea EN

2016-03-12 20:05

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AEC recycled names over the years, so that the Regent name that was first seen at the end of the 1920s could still be seen in production as late as 1968, although there was very little resemblance between the original Regent and a late model Regent mark V. Likewise with the Regal, although it didn't survive as long. The Reliance also had its origins at the end of the 1920s, but it disappeared from production fairly quickly, only reappearing in the 1950s.
The Renown was originally a three axle chassis built in both single deck and double deck form (London had both), but in the 1960s the name was applied to a lowheight double decker. London Transport had one as a demonstrator.

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