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1974 BMW 2002

1974 BMW 2002 in Die Geschichte der Deutschen Eisenbahn, Mini-Series, 2000 Ep. 3

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: DE

1974 BMW 2002

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Ingo DE

2007-10-03 20:40

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Owned by a member of the US Army. That US-size-license plate with black letters was in use for civil cars of GI's in Germany until 2001, I think.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-03 22:07:41

Buc84 US

2007-10-04 03:32

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"U.S. Forces in Germany".Looks to be the 1983-90 style issue.(Replaced the old "Green Plates".Current style is near identical to a "Regular Issue" German plate.)It also looks like a US Spec car,too?

Ingo DE

2007-10-04 20:34

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No, I don't think so. The cateyes on the side are missing.

Anyways, even now, the GI's in Germany are known for two "types" of cars they use: a) they brought their US-cars with them -to see from far away, because mostly models, which were not available in Europse) or b) they are buying old, rotten BMW and Mercedes, mostly some in big sizes, in which Germans are not interested any more, because the running costs are too high.

hiergehts CH

2007-10-05 03:27

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It is always fun when one is driving in Germany and sees a US car brought over from the states by a soldier or their family. Most are not higher end models but older ones near the bottom that a European buyer would most likely never want to own - a Ford Tempo, Plymouth Acclaim/Dodge Spirit, Oldsmobile Achieva, Chevy Corsica, etc. (I have seen these models myself) as they are generally quite mediocre compared to what can be bought as a 10 year old and used car from EU carmakers.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-05 12:43:19 (G-MANN)

Buc84 US

2007-10-05 05:00

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Both comments prove that even all these years later,some things never change! :lol: Though the ones we "took over" were at least better cars than those named,they still were nothing really special??(At least here??) (At different times,1964 Ford Galaxie,1968 Mercury Monterey(Which we sold over there when we left that tour...to a German!!),1975 Ford LTD(This car went TWICE).All were 4 doors,All were Blue & White.)

G-MANN UK

2007-10-05 12:43

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If you are an American soldier, is it really worth having your car brought over (do they have to pay for this?) instead of buying or leasing another car over there? The film Buffalo Soldiers (which I did) features American cars parked in the background at the U.S. Army base in West Germany but the main character drives a flashy Mercedes SEC (he's only a low-ranking enlisted soldier but he deals drugs on the side). A few of the other characters drive German cars like VWs instead of American imports.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-05 12:46:55

antp BE

2007-10-05 13:17

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If I could for free import my car in a far country (e.g. USA for me), I'd maybe do it. It could be funny to drive a Peugeot 206 SW in USA, quite unusual car there :D (despite its too small engine)

-- Last edit: 2007-10-05 14:09:38

chris40 UK

2007-10-05 16:46

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antp wrote If I could for free import my car in a far country (e.g. USA for me), I'd maybe do it. It could be funny to drive a Peugeot 206 SW in USA, quite unusual car there :D (despite its too small engine)


Reminds me of the urban legend of an American journalist who, at the end of a tour of duty in Paris, brought his 2cv home to the States ... and was promptly pulled over on a freeway for driving too slowly. The Deuche, of course, was flat out. :lol:

G-MANN UK

2007-10-05 16:54

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I wouldn't bother importing my car (I don't even have one at the moment) especially if it would cost a lot of money, unless it was something I really cared about. If I moved to America, I'd would want to try an American car. And I was an American soldier, I think I'd want to try a European car. And if I was was stationed in Britain, I wouldn't want to drive a LHD car. Plus if it needed fixing parts would probably cost more to get hold of.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-05 16:55:34

Ingo DE

2007-10-05 22:24

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The transportation of car from of to the U.S. is quite cheap for GI's. I know that from a former GI, who took a K 70 and a Karmann Ghia Typ 14 in 2001 from Germany back to the U.S.
Later we had a big drama, because the windscreen of the K 70 was broken. Very bad with a car, from which 3 actually are existing in the U.S. The transportation of that windscreen was a much bigger thing, than to transport the cars.


The first car of the father of a Japanese friend was 1959 Ford Taunus P2, formerly brought from a US-soldier from Germany to Okinawa. One of two P2-Taunus, which ever have existed in Japan.

Ingo DE

2007-10-05 22:28

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When I'm driving in the Middle and Southwest of Germany, where US-soliers are stationated, sometimes I'm a bit mad about some of these guys, because they are driving like at home: slowly on the middle or the left lane.

G-MANN UK

2007-10-05 22:53

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When you say left lane, you mean the fastest lane? In that case make them feel more at home and undertake them, that's what everyone does in America!

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 01:25

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G-MANN wrote If you are an American soldier, is it really worth having your car brought over (do they have to pay for this?) instead of buying or leasing another car over there? The film Buffalo Soldiers (which I did) features American cars parked in the background at the U.S. Army base in West Germany but the main character drives a flashy Mercedes SEC (he's only a low-ranking enlisted soldier but he deals drugs on the side). A few of the other characters drive German cars like VWs instead of American imports.
I don't know about now,but in the time I was there with my family,above a certain rank,it was at full government expense if it met US safety standards.My Father was a Senior NCO(Sergeant 1st Class--Master Sergeant)so our(1)car & furniture(to a certain weight) went over & back for free.A common thing also for some soldiers was to take one over,sell it,and buy a Mercedes Benz/BMW/Porsche and bring "it" home.Many G.I's do buy older European cars as well,just as needing a basic car to drive,and sell it when they leave?

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 01:33

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Ingo wrote When I'm driving in the Middle and Southwest of Germany, where US-soliers are stationated, sometimes I'm a bit mad about some of these guys, because they are driving like at home: slowly on the middle or the left lane.
Sounds a little like my(late)Father,except he stayed in the right(slow)lane? But then,he always prefered the side roads anyway if he wasn't in a real hurry!! (We did a LOT of sightseeing on weekends!!) Only "fast" driver in the bunch(Meaning my Father & myself) was me on the last tour,when I was able to get my "US Forces" license?? ("Fast"; I'd get over(sometimes,"well over" :D ) 75-80 mph on the Autobahn!!)


-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 01:42:42

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 01:44

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That's pretty cushy, I've never heard of British servicemen taking their big posessions overseas. But then I don't know if we have large bases in many other countries, I think the largest deployments of troops (aside from Iraq and Afghanistan) are in Cyprus, Gibraltar, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. But then our military has a fraction of the manpower and budget of the U.S. military so our soldiers probably don't get as many perks. Of course servicemen won't be taking their cars to places where there's conflict going on.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 01:50:59

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 01:48

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Buc84 wrote when I was able to get my "US Forces" license?? ("Fast"; I'd get over(sometimes,"well over" :D ) 75-80 mph on the Autobahn!!)


What car did your father drive? Can't have been a very fast car, 80mph is normal for most people on British motorways, but on autobahns there's no limit so they are free to drive as fast as their car will go, 140mph or even more!

-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 01:49:00

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 01:52

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By the way have you seen Buffalo Soldiers? What did you think of it? It was set in about 1989, just before the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 01:54

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G-MANN wrote

What car did your father drive? Can't have been a very fast car, 80mph is normal for most people on British motorways, but on autobahns there's no limit so they are free to drive as fast as their car will go, 140mph or even more!
That tour,a 1975 Ford LTD 4 door sedan. "Well Over 80 mph"....I got up to "almost" top speed on it's 120 mph speedo!!!

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 01:57

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G-MANN wrote By the way have you seen Buffalo Soldiers? What did you think of it? It was set in about 1989, just before the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Haven't seen it,but I know people who have? Filmed it at the former base in Karlsruhe,didn't they?? ("Patrick Henry" Kaserne??)

Gag Halfrunt UK

2007-10-06 02:00

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Buc84 wrote Haven't seen it,but I know people who have? Filmed it at the former base in Karlsruhe,didn't they?? ("Patrick Henry" Kaserne??)

The IMDB lists Karlsruhe as one of the filming locations:
http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0252299/locations

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 02:05

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When did you live in Germany? I assume the 84 in your name refers to the year you were born.

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 02:05

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G-MANN wrote That's pretty cushy, I've never heard of British servicemen taking their big posessions overseas. But then I don't know if we have large bases in many other countries, I think the largest deployments of troops (aside from Iraq and Afghanistan) are in Cyprus, Gibraltar, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. But then our military has a fraction of the manpower and budget of the U.S. military so our soldiers probably don't get as many perks. Of course servicemen won't be taking their cars to places where there's conflict going on.
Certain places,we couldn't take those things,either? Though I "do" recall seeing British Royal Army & Royal Air Force personnel in Germany driving RHD English cars?? (The "biggest" perk,several countries Armed Forces do this...and it's one of the best ones....if it's not a combat zone,most places you'll get to take your Family with you!! :) )

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 02:16

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G-MANN wrote When did you live in Germany? I assume the 84 in your name refers to the year you were born.
Actually,it's the year I graduated High School!! The name is actually a reference that part of my life,though; The "mascot" of the American H.S.(Baumholder) I went to(but was transferred out of to the States just before Graduation :( ) was the Buccaneer,or the "Bucs" for short?? I was there 4 different times from Oct,1966(carried onto a plane!)to Jan,1984(Dragged onto a Plane! :lol: )(Augsburg,1966-68; Neu Ulm 1972-75; Baumholder 1977-80,then back 18 mos later 1981-84)


-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 02:19:57

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 02:25

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I'll admit I've never been in the forces nor has anyone in my family and at the moment I don't still know anyone who has been in forces and been overseas. I've just never heard of any British troops taking their cars with them (although taking a car across the channel into Europe would be far easier than taking one across the Atlantic), and I have known people in the forces or connected to the forces (I used to be in the Air Training Corps when I was younger, which is like an RAF version of the JROTC). Taking your car with you isn't as a important a priority as taking your family with you is it? Some British children with fathers (or mothers) serving overseas get sent to boarding school, usually those whose parents are officers.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 02:28:33

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 02:47

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As crazy as it seems(though it made sense?)the US Military did this after W.W.II and beyond (Getting to bring your family) as an incentive to keep in the "Career" Military(Like Dad..34 yrs!!) people,or to get them to make a career of it.Wasn't a bad way to grow up.either!!! I -think- the bringing over of a car started mostly due to lack of availabity of vehicles in the early years of sending people over to Europe & Japan,(But IIRC,not S.Korea??)and they just kept up the practice later? (BTW: Dad "Almost" traded that LTD on a 420(?)..the Larger "S Classe" one,I think this one was a 79 or 80 model??)Mercedes sedan,but he changed his mind?....something says to me that he wouldn't have traded in that 'Benz on an '84 Buick Regal later on?? :lol: )


-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 03:14:38 (G-MANN)

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 02:48

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Of course it must be a strain to spend a lot of time apart from your wife and children (if you have any), that's probably one of the reasons why a lot of people in the British military don't seem make it their lifelong career, only the high flyers seem to stay in after 40. Most young soldiers I hear about (and some I've known) only spend a few years in the forces. I'm not sure if our military caters to the families as well as the US military does, it's so much smaller (less than 200,000 active personnel compared to the 1.4 million in the US military) it probably doesn't have as large an infrastructure. The UK actually has the second highest military budget in the world at $73 billion but the USA surpasses it by far with a budget of $550 billion! I read this on wikipedia, I was quite suprised to discover we were number 2, and some people say our military is underfunded. Actually what am I saying, of course we're number 2, we're the only ones who backed America in Iraq!

It sounds like you spent most of your childhood overseas (I believe the term is "Army brat"), that must have been interesting. What was it like? I've heard US Army bases are like little cities, they provide all sorts of services and support to the families of troops.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 03:14:53

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 03:16

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G-MANN wrote It sounds like you spent most of your childhood overseas (I believe the term is "Army brat"), that must have been interesting. What was it like? I've heard US Army bases are like little cities, they provide all sorts of services and support to the families of troops.
You heard very correctly! Housing,Stores,a complete School system,Hospitals,we had them all!!! And it was a fun way to grow up,to a degree? (Baader-Meinhof was VERY active at the time,that was definately NOT fun!) Saw things & places that some people simply don't believe when I tell them?? (Lots of castles,including 'Mad' King Ludwig II's castles,the "real" Oktoberfest,climbed up the tallest church spire in the World,(There's stairs inside of it,..Munster Cathederal,Ulm)all kinds of places most people here only have heard of in a book?) Never did get to visit England,though....and we wanted to,just never got to go?? (Though one my older sisters did on her own?)And yes,I'm guilty as charged of being an "Army Brat"....I've never took offense of that name,because it is true,I -am- one!


-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 03:23:19

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 03:20

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Oh,for the who "don't" know...."Mad King Ludwig",...Ludwig II of Bavaria.He got this bizarre,but affectionate nickname for one of his hobbies......he liked building Castles!!! A very lasting--and now profitable!!--legacy!!

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 03:22

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I don't think our overseas bases have a school system, hence why a lot of soldiers' kids end up going to boarding school, which can't be that great. Were you ever in the military yourself?

-- Last edit: 2007-10-06 03:27:56

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 03:38

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Some of ours do too,but this is like the -really- remote bases,like some Radar site out in the middle of nowhere....those kids were "Dormies",either go home on weekends,or long holidays?? (Italy,Greece,Turkey and I think Scotland had some places like this?) We had a few like this in my school,but they really just stayed with another family Mon-Fri during the school year.

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 03:46

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G-MANN wrote Were you ever in the military yourself?
I wanted to,but couldn't pass the physical? ("Big Thing" to them was I'm about 50% deaf in my L.Ear since I was about 15 yr old....inner ear trouble "took" it. Also very nearsighted. :( )

Buc84 US

2007-10-06 03:50

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chris40 wrote

Reminds me of the urban legend of an American journalist who, at the end of a tour of duty in Paris, brought his 2cv home to the States ... and was promptly pulled over on a freeway for driving too slowly. The Deuche, of course, was flat out. :lol:
I did the opposite thing....I got pulled over just after I came back to the US,I forgot for a moment the Speed Limit on "our" freeways was (then) 55 mph,was clocked at 90 or so! :whistle:

G-MANN UK

2007-10-06 04:17

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Buc84 wrote I wanted to,but couldn't pass the physical?


Sorry to hear that. Anyway nice talking to you ;)

garco NL

2007-10-06 06:36

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I think it's a BMW... :)

Nice comments to read btw ;)

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